TARDIS Technical Index

Space-Time Telegraph

(aka Analogue Cross Time Telephone)

Just like more primitive telegraphs, Space-Time Telegraphs (sometimes known as Analogue Cross Time Telephones) can send messages to one another. If one splits a quark, the two resulting sub-particles behave as if they are in communication - even if they are separated by space and time. This is the key to trans-temporal communications and it can be used to allow one space-time telegraph to communicate with another one using t-mail. T-Mail (probably short for Telepathic Mail) consists of Artron signals that have been modulated into a syonic beam with spatio-temporal frequencies and extra-temperaneous wavelengths.

Because of the requirement of a quantum connection, the sender will require the receiving Time Lord's bio-data extract to send the signal. This extract is often stored within the transmitter's database. The Telepathic Circuits of another TARDIS can receive the syonic beam and the signal conversion unit controls that telepathic energy. A telepathic 'chime' tell the Time Lord that a message has arrived. After conversion, the t-mail can then be presented using the audio units, scanner screen, and/or the trans-temporal projector. Or the message can simply be projected into the operator's mind. When tied in with the TARDIS's central cortex and the voice integrator the telepathic circuits can even make all of a speaker's words come out backwards - at both ends of the communications.

Once the syonic beam has been received, the coordinates of the sender can be printed out on a strip of paper. If one knows the right command codes, a Space-Time Telegraph can be used to remotely access a TARDIS's Informational System. If the circumstances are right these waves can even travel between universes. But such a transmission would require the energy of a supernova.

Most Time Lords limit their use of T-mail due to the possible damage to the Web of Time that such transmissions might cause. For important information the Celestial Intervention Agency transmats Secure Delivery Capsules (SDCs) to their agents. But, when timeliness is more important then security, the CIA will send messages via t-mail. To ensure the existence of back up copies, top secret message are routed through the TARDIS closest to the receiver. These messages are encoded to prevent the relay TARDIS owner from reading them.

Color Key

The following color code is used:

  • Black: For information from the TV Series, including Dimensions in Time, and 1996 TV Movie.
  • Blue: For information from the Novels and Audios including Target, Virgin, BCC, and Big Finish.
  • Green: For information from 'licensed' reference sources such as the Technical Manual, Doctor Who Magazine, and the Role Playing Games.
  • Red: For information from unofficial sources -The Faction Paradox series, behind the scenes interviews, author's speculation, and popular fan belief.
  • The TARDIS Technical Index is copyright Will B Swift.

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